Voice of the Customer

Satisfying the Mobile Customer During Micro-Moments

Brands can no longer consider mobile strategy to be insignificant. Today’s smartphone users check their phone almost immediately upon waking and they keep their device by their side for a majority of the day. Micro-moments, which are the crucial mobile moments of truth during the digital customer journey, influence purchase decisions.

The Four Types of Micro-Moments

1. I Want to Know: The consumer gathers information about a topic or product.

2. I Want to Go: The consumer wants to know where to go and when to go there for either an activity or to find a product.

3. I Want to Buy: The consumer gathers information about purchases, opinions, special deals, facts and comparisons regarding products or services. They may do this when they’re in the brick-and-mortar store.

4. I Want to Do: The consumer gathers how-to information on a variety of topics, like home repair or beauty techniques.

During these micro-moments, brands have the opportunity to serve the customer in three main ways:

1. Be present.

During the “I want to know” micro-moment, make sure it’s your brand’s information that shows up in search results. To do this, the metadata of your content (titles, descriptions, tags) must be optimized. Figure out which terms people are using when searching for the type of content you product. When developing your content, include information about your niche, not just your brand. Consumers often search for a category, not a specific company, when looking for a product or service. Your content should incorporate industry-specific trends, topics and events.

2. Be helpful.

Consumers prefer to choose brands that regularly provide them with helpful information, like how-to guides and unboxing videos. To generate content ideas that satisfy your “be helpful” goal, read comments on your own content or on the content of your competitors. This is where you’ll discover needs that have yet to be filled. What are people still trying to learn? What questions haven’t been answered yet? You can also straightforwardly ask your customers what they want. For example, send a poll or questionnaire to your mailing list to find out their most plaguing questions or what kind of content they’d like to see from you.

3. Be fast.

The purchase process a customer goes through has to be quick. If there are too many steps, they’ll go to another brand. Eliminate as many steps as possible and consider enabling one-click functionality. The opportunity to make a purchase should be obvious and at the beginning of your content.

Register for the Journey of the Connected Customer Virtual Conference to learn more about the Mobile Customer.

Customer Journey Mapping Techniques: Research and Behavioral

There are several different approaches to mapping the customer journey. Two popular techniques are research mapping, which involves voice of the customer data, and behavioral mapping, which determines the customer’s underlying reasons for taking certain actions.

In general, improving the current customer journey map follows four main stages. First, it’s necessary to create a framework that includes the standard stages of the journey that practically any customer and persona will go through, like making a purchase and requiring customer service support. Then, you need to map the current customer journey, including the various channels and touchpoints that different customer segments will experience. Next, you’ll have to create a future customer journey map that improves upon the current customer journey. Lastly, determine where the gaps are between the current and future customer journey maps and decide how to close those gaps.

How you create a future customer journey map and close the gaps will vary, depending on the approach you take.

Research Mapping

Voice of the customer research is used to determine if the current plotted customer journey is truthfully reflecting the actual customer experience. Both qualitative and quantitative research are used to create a prediction-based map. Voice of the customer data helps the brand plot both the current and the predicted performance at various touch points. These plot points, also called CX Curves, help determine the Moments of Truth, which are the instances when the customer has their greatest expectations. Pain Points are included in the Moments of Truth, referring to the times when the brand is performing at its lowest, especially if there’s a major gap between the customer’s expectations and the company’s performance. Voice of the customer data also helps the brand determine what drives certain behaviors, such as brand loyalty and repurchasing.

Behavior Mapping

For behavior customer journey mapping, a creative approach is taken, similar to storytelling. Touch points are assessed to determine what the customer is thinking, feeling and doing at those moments. With a behavioral science approach, customer journey mapping is based on both the behaviors of the customer and the reasons behind those behaviors. A narrative is created that details how various customer personas will behave throughout the journey. While behavioral mapping is used to design real life experiences, like when a customer enters a retail store, it’s also used for virtual settings and when the customer calls a contact center.