Contact Center Workforce Management

How to Motivate Contact Center Agents

There are several reasons to motivate contact center agents: hiring new staff can get expensive; training new hires means there’s lag time between when they’re hired and when they can start working; and company morale can decrease if there’s a high rate of turnover. Here are 5 ways to motivate contact center agents.
All of the tools your agents use, from software to hardware, should work flawlessly. Faulty technology makes it impossible for agents to be efficient. One necessary type of tool are those that reduce customer frustration. Agents can get frazzled after speaking with one angry customer after the other. Software that allows for queue callback or voicemail can make customers happy, which in turn delivers agents fewer frustrating inquiries.
2. Setup seamless automation.
Quality contact center software will automate manual tasks so that agents don’t have to perform them with every single call or chat. Data should also be synced across all customer service tools. When their workload is streamlined, agents have more time and energy to handle more pressing issues.
3. Help agents hone their specialties.
Instead of having all of your agents trained in every area, figure out the strengths of your individual agents and help them specialize. Some agents may excel at handling agitated customers while others will have in-depth knowledge of your products. When you have agents who are experts in certain areas, they’ll be able to answer queries and solve problems more quickly than if they only had limited knowledge of the niche.
4. Open the lines of communication.
Your contact center agents are the closest people to your customers. It’s important that your agents know they can speak with you openly. Not only will you hear great ideas you haven’t thought of before, but agents who feel valued and needed are more likely to perform well in their job.
5. Use analytics to acknowledge excellence.
With call center reporting, you can see how agents are performing. When you find an agent who spends a short time on calls and has a high FCR rate, for example, you can reward them for their performance. You can also see which agents have positive customer reviews and reward them accordingly.
When your agents are motivated and happy, they’re better able to deliver the sort of customer experience you expect.

Contact Center WFM: Dealing With Toxic Employees

Meeting contact center staffing needs goes beyond the science of predicting when you’ll need employees – it’s also about choosing people who are right for the contact center. What happens when all goes well during the hiring phases, but once hired an employee becomes toxic?

Accepting That You Have a Toxic Employee

Toxic employees are much different than difficult employees. They cause psychological pain and often influence others with their behavior. They often find their bad behavior fun and engage in certain behavior simply to find out if they can get away with it. Take note of how your other agents are reacting. Do they seem to have a slump in energy? Are they frustrated most of the time? Do they complain that they’re constantly being put-down?

Determining the Cause of the Behavior

Is the employee not happy with an aspect of their job or are they facing difficult circumstances in their home life? Are they upset with one or more co-workers? If there’s a reason for why they’re acting a certain way, it’s possible that they just need some help in order to improve, saving you the trouble of having to find a replacement.

Explaining the Behavior

Sometimes toxic agents are oblivious to how much destruction they’re causing. Explain to them what their behavior is and how it’s affecting the rest of the contact center. Guide them on how to improve. Make sure that they understand the consequences if they don’t change. Will they lose a privilege that they enjoy, like setting a flexible schedule or getting an end-of-year bonus? The initial consequence doesn’t have to be that they’ll lose their job (though that may be a possibility down the line).

Cutting the Cord

In the end, if the employee will need to be let go, it will require some sort of documentation. Even if you’re confident that the situation will improve without having to fire the employee, document everything from the beginning. A pattern of behavior has to be established by providing as much material as possible. This will protect you in the event that you do need to let the employee go.

It’s not unheard of for a contact center agent to turn toxic once they’ve been hired. Traits that went unnoticed before can be exposed. Knowing the red flags of toxic behavior can help you find and replace those employees immediately.

How Contact Centers Use RPA

Robotic process automation (RPA) covers an assortment of advanced, intelligent tools that can carry out a variety of routine tasks. RPA systems are programmed to automate repetitive and rules-based actions that are normally performed manually by contact center agents. While these tasks are integral to the contact center as they help with essential functions, agents are most valuable when they can spend their time on more urgent and complex issues.

How Does RPA Work?

RPA integrates with contact center systems to catch and understand how various applications work. The RPA software is then taught to interpret different processes, such as processing certain types of transactions and triggering responses. RPA technology uses different tools to capture this digital data, such as image recognition and server access. Since RPA works at an interface level, it rarely needs IT support.

What Can You Automate with RPA?

There are a host of processes to automate with RPA. Everything from updating customer mailing addresses and order history to handling time-sensitive transactions for high-value customers can be programmed. While RPA has more in common with artificial intelligence than standard automation, it works best with processes that are defined, repetitious and rules-based. RPA can complete the following types of tasks:

  • Bill customers
  • Close fraudulent accounts
  • Compliance reporting
  • Order processing
  • Override transactions for VIP customers
  • Resolve disputes and complaints
  • Send shipping notifications
  • Update client profiles

RPA can also be programmed to carry out industry-specific tasks. For example, an insurance company may use RPA to generate renewal premiums and process claims. A bank could program RPA to process overdraft protection requests and credit applications. In the healthcare industry, RPA is used to register patients and verify credentials of healthcare providers. Human Resources departments can use RPA to manage W4 forms.

Will RPA Replace Live Workers?

There’s a lot of concern over whether or not RPA will impact staffing. It’s undeniable that RPA has numerous benefits for the contact center. It reduces agent workload, boosts efficiency and eliminates the risk of human error. The contact center overall enjoys a higher ROI and lower training costs. Customer interaction times are reduced and the customer experience as a whole is enhanced. While the answer depends on each specific company, some feel that instead of cutting down their staff, RPA is most useful because it allows companies to handle a higher work volume.