CGS Survey Discovers that Security and Privacy are Top Concerns for Customer Service Interactions

CGS, a global provider of business applications, enterprise learning and outsourcing services, discusses its findings from its 2019 CGS Customer Service Security and Compliance Survey. The results showed that despite demands for faster, more personalized interactions, consumers have strong opinions when it comes to their security and privacy rights. With reports from the latest Edelman Trust Barometer showing that only 49 percent of the U.S. general population trusts businesses (down from 52 percent in 2017), companies must work to strike a balance between providing a tailored customer experience and respecting their customers’ data preferences.

CGS surveyed more than 500 U.S. consumers to assess their preferences and concerns around customer service interactions. The survey looked at what types of information individuals are willing to share, how they are willing to share (e.g., through a human agent, social media, chatbot) and any apprehensions they have with sharing their personal data. Key findings from the survey include:

Automated Technology Still Lacks Consumer Trust 
Despite the rapid adoption of mobile and artificial intelligence (AI) technology, almost 60 percent of respondents still believe that phone interactions are the most secure customer service channel. In fact, more than two-thirds (68 percent) of respondents said they don’t trust automated technology with personal data including birthdates, account numbers and social security numbers. As more businesses adopt automated and AI-driven service solutions, they must be transparent about how customer data will be stored and managed to encourage consumer confidence in next-gen technology.   

Past Experiences with Data Exposures Leave Consumers Feeling Vulnerable 
Data breaches have become commonplace for many consumers: 63 percent of respondents reported receiving an alert that their personal data had potentially been exposed or breached. Such experiences are affecting future interactions. Nearly 70 percent of respondents said they are unlikely to return to a company that has exposed their personal information. With data exposures and breaches happening more frequently, companies must have a plan in place as to how they will notify customers if an incident occurs. Being completely prepared for data vulnerabilities may be impossible, but offering remediations and additional protections in the future could help rebuild consumer trust.

Consumers Consent to Providing Information – If They Trust the Brand 
Although consumers are looking for personalized interactions, they are wary of sharing their information with companies. When asked if they would give a company the authority to store their information for future interactions, only three percent of respondents said they would always give consent. More than half of the respondents (56 percent) would give consent if they trusted the brand, but 41 percent would never allow their information to be stored, citing security concerns.

Additionally, consumers are uncertain about how their data is currently being managed by companies. Only 15 percent of respondents felt that they have a clear understanding of what information is being stored from their interactions with companies. While personalized customer service interactions are essential to success, organizations must demonstrate respect for their customers’ data privacy preferences. This means being transparent with customers about how their data will be used and protected.

To view the findings, see the  infographic.

 

 

How Robotic Process Automation Makes Contact Centers More Efficient

Automation isn’t new. Technologies like Interactive Voice Response have been around for a long time. But while advancements like these have reduced costs for the contact center, they’ve also managed to annoy customers. In the case of IVR, callers often get stuck in menu loops or struggle with systems that don’t understand what they’re saying. Enter robotic process automation.

Robotic Process Automation and Artificial Intelligence

Contact centers are in the business of serving the customer, and in an effort to improve the customer experience, technologies are always emerging. Robotic process automation (RPA) is one of them, automating tasks and freeing up agents to personally handle complex issues. RPA uses Natural Language Processing, which is related to artificial intelligence, an even more advanced type of automation that can make human-like judgments about tasks.

Interactive Text Response for Customer Service

Interactive Text Response (ITR), more casually referred to as chatbots, goes hand-in-hand with the increasing popularity of messaging apps. Brands that want to improve the customer experience are making themselves available on chat – and it’s working. More than 70% of 1-800-Flowers’ chatbot orders come from first-time customers, and the company’s commitment to new tech has attracted tens of thousands of users. Chatbots are more effective than IVR because text input is easier for the system to understand than spoken language. AI can then be used to gain a deeper understanding of what the customer is saying, accounting for the different ways a customer may phrase a sentence or question.

Sample Phone Call with RPA

RPA can also be used with phone calls, not just chatbots. Here’s an example of how RPA can help with a live call:

  • Jane calls to speak with an agent.
  • Your RPA takes the call and authenticates Jane by confirming her account number and call-in PIN.
  • Your RPA analyzes Jane’s account and sees that she has an open ticket and that she’s just been on the website to look at the status.
  • Your RPA says something like, “I see that you have an open ticket with us. Is that the reason for your call?” Jane confirms that this is the reason for the call.
  • Jane is transferred to an appropriate live agent.

Contact center technology like RPA can help customers solve their issues more quickly, but it can also provide much-needed support to agents by making them more efficient.

How Will Contact Center Channels Change in 2019?

Customer-centric businesses are working harder than ever to support all of the channels that their customers want to use. That’s why 84% of companies who consider themselves to be customer-centric have a heavy focus on supporting mobile channels for a greater customer experience. COPC reported that mobile care increases by 41% in 2018 alone.

The results from the 2018-2019 ContactBabel Report, as shown, illustrate that as mobile becomes more widely used by end users, channels like email, telephone, letter, and fax are expected to decrease in interactions. The channel with the largest expected increase in interactions for 2019 is web chat, with 56% of survey respondents believing there will be an increase. Social media customer service and SMS followed with 46% and 36% expecting an increase in interactions.inbound channnels

Both the need to retain strong CX strategies around traditional channels like email, voice, and IVR, and the need to add new channels has companies wondering how to create and run a true omnichannel contact center that empowers agents and delights customers. The ContactBabel Omnichannel Report walks though more stats from their survey, which could help you in your omnichannel journey.

inbound calls 2019

With traditional channels like voice, email, and chat, as well as channels like SMS/text, video, in-app, social messengers, and bots, Bright Pattern is the only true omnichannel provider that can be turned on in just days!

5 Strategies for an Enhanced Customer Experience

Customers don’t hesitate to talk about a negative experience with a brand ­– they tell their friends and, more importantly, post critiques online for the rest of your customers to see. Even one bad experience can spoil a customer to a company forever. Customer experience has to be a top priority for contact centers in order to promote satisfaction and loyalty.

  1. Treat all interactions with the same care.

There isn’t one type of feedback that’s more important than another ­– they’re all valuable and important. If you’re going to have various communication paths set up – Twitter, email surveys, live chat – you need to be available and responsive on all of them with the same amount of attention. Otherwise, consider if that channel is important enough to keep.

  1. Invest in cognitive computing.

Cognitive computing technology takes natural language processing a step further ­– it can tell how a person is feeling by analyzing the sentiment behind what they’re saying. The agent can then adjust their responses in order to improve the customer’s mood to either neutral or happy before the call is over.

  1. Allow all employees to make decisions.

Unless there’s a legitimate reason why an employee can’t resolve a situation on their own, give your agents the power to make key decisions. For example, if discounts or refunds are usually offered to customers who meet certain criteria, allow your agents to present the offer without having to transfer the customer to a supervisor.

  1. Offer excellent advice for the individual customer.

If you have advice to give, give it! The customer experience is largely based on building relationships. Customers will trust you if you give them valuable advice even when it’s not directly promoting one of your products or services. Creating a loyal customer can be more important than getting another sale right this second.

  1. Make self-service obvious and easy.

You can build a solid relationship with a customer without speaking with them one-on-one. Remember, the company overall is developing the relationship; the relationship isn’t between the agent and the customer, necessarily. Many customers want the option of self-service. Knowing they can accomplish a task on their own can boost the sentiment they have for your company.

When you put customers at the center of your business goals, you’ll be in a better position to deliver the quality experiences they demand.

How Desktop Automation Improves Agent Performance

Desktop automation has a major impact on the customer service industry. Contact center agents use automation to finish tasks faster and quickly access data, which leaves plenty of energy for delighting customers and providing top notch service.

How Desktop Automation Tools Work

  • Hotkeys or triggers immediately start a specific workflow on the computer. By triggering a workflow with just one click, agents save a lot of time that used to be spent on manual processes.
  • Desktop automation software usually comes with standard workflows that you can start using right away. You’ll also have the option to customize the workflows or create brand new ones.
  • Different apps trigger different actions based on how the customer interacts with it, all without requiring the agent to be logged in at the moment.

Sample Desktop Automation Workflow

Step 1: Software identifies and authenticates the customer.

Step 2: A live agent listens to the customer and then determines that they need to provide more information.

Step 3: The software collects the additional data.

Step 4: The live agent reconnects with the customer to verify that the information has been received and to finalize the conversation.

This may sound clunky if you think of it in terms of a calling customer ­– transferring a customer back and forth between a computer system and an agent is frustrating. However, if it’s happening on live chat, the customer probably won’t realize when they’re speaking with a chatbot as opposed to a real agent.

Benefits of Desktop Automation

  • Desktop automation puts robots next to agents so they can carry out simpler tasks. The robots are unobtrusive – they’re a tool for the agents, not something that gets in the way.
  • Automation tools also handle the tasks that are more prone to errors when in the hands of live agents.
  • Desktop automation tools don’t get tired. They’ll continue making the same decisions no matter how long they’ve been working. Agents are then free to connect on an emotional level with customers and they’ll have the energy needed to do so.

Contact center systems can be complex, with multiple applications for different needs. This is why so many contact centers are streamlining operations with desktop automation. Existing applications can be combined into one user-friendly platform to ease workflows and automate tasks. Agents no longer have to spend time on data entry or get stuck navigating complex systems.

How to Increase Customer Loyalty

By Chris Keller

Customer retention is one of the most important contributors to growth, especially when profits are slipping. But customer loyalty stretches far beyond simply enjoying the products or services a business offers. Truly loyal customers enjoy your company so much that they will promote it for free and go out of their way to support you.

There are five main reasons why increasing customer loyalty is important:

  1. Word-of-mouth advertising: It’s real and it works. When people we trust recommend a service or company to us, we are more likely to check it out over advertising or promotions.
  2. They’ll stick around: A customer who visits your business or purchases your services frequently is less likely to abruptly jump ship. They like what your company stands for and will stick with you when times are tough. Even in the face of, say, a shipping snafu or damaged product delivery, a loyal customer is more likely to give you the benefit of the doubt than look elsewhere for a similar product or service.
  3. They’ll come back more often: Sometimes loyal customers frequent the business more than they logically should — even if they don’t need to — just to support the company.
  4. They can act as a focus group: Many people take to social media asking for recommendations or opinions on products or services. Your loyal customer base will often answer those posts and share their insights. They will also share any feedback with you (good or bad) because they want to help your business succeed.
  5. They’ll always take your side: Loyal customers will always choose your product or service over a competitor, which gives you a competitive advantage.

Strategies for Building Customer Retention

Understanding the benefits of customer loyalty is important, but you need to build strategies to gain that loyalty. Below are nine customer retention strategies to jumpstart your business again and reconnect with your customers.

  1. Mission statement: Sometimes a brand inspires loyalty not through its products or services, but through what they stand for. There are many outdoor and active pursuit apparel brands, but one, in particular, is known for their strong environmental support and activism. Patagonia has a loyal customer base in a competitive market, and much of that is focused around their mission to save the environment.
  2. Convenience: Make your products and services as accessible as possible. Create tools, such as apps or online ordering, to make it easier for customers to take advantage of your products and services.
  3. Personalization:C oming across authentic and human is important when building relationships with your customers. Southwest Airlines is a very large organization that deals with thousands of customers daily. But if you check out their Twitter account, their customer service is personal and adds that human touch element most customers look for when trying to connect with a brand.

blogpoc

Southwest is able to carry on with responses like this because they’ve identified their audience personas and are communicating with them on channels those customers use frequently (for your business, this could be email, phone, etc.). Southwest encourages their customers to reach out through Twitter so they can continue to provide quick, efficient and friendly customer service.

4.Gamification: Typically gamification is recognized more as an acquisition tool, but it’s also effective with customer retention. Offering your customers rewards for completing valuable actions for your company is an effective way to use this tool. Think about rewarding current customers when they refer a new customer, for example. Or you could offer a discount or free gift once they reach a certain purchase threshold.

  1. Subscriptions: Is there a way you can use subscriptions to bolster customer loyalty? For example, think about offering a subscription service that includes free shipping, faster delivery, priority booking, etc. You don’t have to charge a fee for a subscription model to gain customer loyalty. If you provide these benefits in the form of exclusiveness, it’s another way to leverage this approach and enhance your customer experience.
  2. Education: One of the most valuable things you can offer your customers is new learning or advice. Your customer’s experience doesn’t end after they make a purchase. Let’s say you own a bicycle shop. Consider sending an email to your customer around the time when they should be conducting their first maintenance tasks, or when they should consider purchasing new tires. Informing them on how to better care for their bike proves that your business is still looking out for them.
  3. Customer support: We touched on this a little earlier, but part of knowing who your customers are is knowing how they use their products — and if they need support, knowing where they turn to in order to get it. Customer services should be an extension of your brand. If your customers look to get their questions answered via Facebook, be sure you are on that platform and actively responding.
  4. Delight: There’s a difference between satisfying your customers and delighting them. Blowout salon Drybar has gone above and beyond with their customer experience. For 45 minutes, customers get to relax, be pampered and drink a cocktail or fruit-infused water as they get their hair styled. These “extras” seem small (and are cheap to offer), but they make a lasting impression on the customer.
  5. Apologize: We all make mistakes, and if handled improperly you risk losing customers. If a mistake does happen, communicate with your customer, apologize sincerely and explain how you will go about preventing it from happening again. You can do this privately with the customer via email, or even publicly on your blog depending on the type of mistake.

Every business is different, so customer retention strategies will vary. The importance of customer loyalty impacts almost every area of running your business. Without happy and satisfied customers continuing to buy from you, your business will not survive. Loyal customers are better for business, and they’ll help you grow by keeping profits high.

Running a successful business can be stressful, and we know there will be times when you have questions. When you do, feel free to check out IncFile’s blog. There are tons of popular posts on important topics such as business marketing and sales that offer tips and advice to help you be successful as you start and manage your company.

This article was originally published on the Incfile Blog.

Chris Keller is a veteran the in business finance industry. Prior to starting his own business, he managed product lines at two Fortune 500 companies focusing on their Profit & Loss statements.

5 Strategies for an Enhanced Customer Experience

Customers don’t hesitate to talk about a negative experience with a brand ¬– they tell their friends and, more importantly, post critiques online for the rest of your customers to see. Even one bad experience can spoil a customer to a company forever. Customer experience has to be a top priority for contact centers in order to promote satisfaction and loyalty.

1. Treat all interactions with the same care.

There isn’t one type of feedback that’s more important than another ¬– they’re all valuable and important. If you’re going to have various communication paths set up – Twitter, email surveys, live chat – you need to be available and responsive on all of them with the same amount of attention. Otherwise, consider if that channel is important enough to keep.

2. Invest in cognitive computing.

Cognitive computing technology takes natural language processing a step further ¬– it can tell how a person is feeling by analyzing the sentiment behind what they’re saying. The agent can then adjust their responses in order to improve the customer’s mood to either neutral or happy before the call is over.

3. Allow all employees to make big decisions.

Unless there’s a legitimate reason why an employee can’t resolve a situation on their own, give your agents the power to make key decisions. For example, if discounts or refunds are usually offered to customers who meet certain criteria, allow your agents to present the offer without having to transfer the customer to a supervisor.

4. Offer excellent advice for the individual customer.

If you have advice to give, give it! The customer experience is largely based on building relationships. Customers will trust you if you give them valuable advice even when it’s not directly promoting one of your products or services. Creating a loyal customer can be more important than getting another sale right this second.

5. Make self-service obvious and easy.

You can build a solid relationship with a customer without speaking with them one-on-one. Remember, the company overall is developing the relationship; the relationship isn’t between the agent and the customer, necessarily. Many customers want the option of self-service. Knowing they can accomplish a task on their own can boost the sentiment they have for your company.

When you put customers at the center of your business goals, you’ll be in a better position to deliver the quality experiences they demand.

How Business Intelligence Makes the Contact Center More Efficient

Business intelligence (BI) is a catch-all term for the data-driven applications, practices and technologies a business uses in order to collect, integrate, analyze and present business information. The overarching goal of BI is to help a business make better decisions.

In the contact center, BI can be incredibly beneficial. There’s a lot of information that can help the contact center improve customer service, so long as the right data is found, meaning is pulled from it and management decides what the next actionable step should be. Here’s how BI solutions can improve efficiency in the contact center:

Smarter time management and scheduling.

Different people are productive at different times of the day. When you’re deciding when your agents will be most productive for scheduling purposes, though, it’s not enough to simply ask them if they’re early birds or night owls. With BI, data can show when certain agents are at their best. Managers can then create a schedule that takes advantage of those peak times.

Identify relevant cross-sells and upsells.

BI tools analyze customer information and buyer persona to help agents pinpoint additional opportunities for sales. The agent can then recommend and cross-sell or upsell the products or services that are most relevant to that specific customer. It’s always easier to convent a current customer than a brand new one, so long as the products they’re hearing about are actually in-line with their interests or needs.

Analyze current and future processes.

Inefficient processes result in more errors, but BI solutions can investigate if a process is working ­– and if it’s not, when and where it’s failing. For example, you can see if more errors are occurring at a specific time of day or on the same day each week, or if a particular agent is making more errors than your other agents. Not only can this type of insight fix current processes but it can also be used to assess future ones before they’re officially implemented. A hypothetical process can be rolled out and tested with BI tools, then either thrown out or refined for actual implementation.

BI is an integral part of customer service. While there are many different types of BI solutions for the contact center, they all share the ability to glean actionable information. BI can improve customer service, raise customer satisfaction levels and improve contact center efficiency.

 

3 Barriers to a Winning Digital Strategy

When it comes to your contact center’s digital strategy, there’s a never-ending amount of information to wade through and technology to choose from. All of these options can make it almost impossible to decide what you need to change or update and how to prioritize everything. When you do start planning, you can get so wrapped up in the digital side of things that you forget your very real audience.

Let’s go over three common barriers to creating a digital strategy that serves your customers.

Barrier #1: Assuming You’re Behind Everyone Else

One of the biggest assumptions about digital strategy is that every other contact center is doing it better. You know you have to create or improve your digital strategy but, feeling like you’re already behind your competitors, your don’t have the drive to do it.

Think of it this way, though – you wouldn’t skip over writing a business plan just because every other business has one, right? The same is true for creating your digital strategy, which is an integral part of your broader IT and business strategies.

Barrier #2: Focusing Solely on the Technology

Digital strategy is about so much more than the specific technologies you’re going to use. When you focus only on the tech, you can miss the bigger picture: connecting with people in the digital age. Your agents, employees and business partners have different expectations than in the past, and that’s due to the digital environment we now live, work and communicate in. Digital strategy has to take this into consideration. Instead of a replacement for relationship building, tech is best when used to uncover the better ways to connect and customize that connection.

Barrier #3: Converting Through Digital Interactions Alone

Your digital strategy only truly works if it makes your customers happy, right? If customer satisfaction goes down, you’re not really making progress, even if your contact center is operating in a high tech way. Since there are so many digital channels your customers are using, it can feel like the best way to spend your marketing budget is on more digital transactions. This is counterintuitive, though. Your digital strategy should leverage technology to help both your agents and your customers while leaving enough room for live, person-to-person communication.

How have you created a digital strategy that puts your customers first? Tell us in the comments.

BRAND KEYS 2019 CUSTOMER LOYALTY ENGAGEMENT INDEX: VERIFIED TRUST = BRAND SUCCESS

Growing concerns regarding privacy and data security have reached a tipping point, driven by an astonishing increase in consumers’ expectations for trust and transparency in the brands they purchase, according to Brand Keys 24th annual Customer Loyalty Engagement Index (CLEI), conducted by the New York-based brand engagement and customer loyalty research consultancy.

Biggest Shift In Expectations For Trust. . . Ever!

“Trust – an engagement factor in every product/service category – has become the indispensable connective tissue between brands and customer loyalty,” said Robert Passikoff, president of Brand Keys. “Consumer expectations for that single value have increased across every category and brand we track, on average by 250+% since 2018. Consumer expectations increase each year – normally in the 2% to 25% range. This is an unprecedented spike.”

Where “Trust” Matters Most

Individual attributes, benefits, and brand values make specific contributions to consumer brand engagement and loyalty. In 2019, the dozen sectors that showed the largest increases in consumers’ expectations for the value of “trust,” increasing 100% or more, were:

  1. Social Networking (300%)
  2. Online Retail (272%)
  3. Department Stores (220%)
  4. AM & PM News (Broadcast & Cable) (205%)
  5. Instant Messaging (180%)
  6. Credit Cards (160%)
  7. Insurance (125%)
  8. Investment Services (120%)
  9. Fast Food Restaurants (118%)
  10. Online Payments (117%)
  11. Ride Share (123%)
  12. Smartphones (105%)

This year the Brand Keys CLEI examined 90 categories and 822 individual brands – from Automotive and Ride Share to Computers and Fast Food. Brand Keys examined Tax Prep and Financial categories, and all Retail (online and brick-and-mortar). Social Networking, Search Engines and Instant Messaging, Cable and Broadcast News, Smartphones, Cosmetics, and Credit Cards. All showed significant increases in consumer expectations for the value of “trust,” some brands significantly more than others.

Consumers Still Shop, But They’re Not Stupid!

“It isn’t just Facebook’s, Google’s, Twitter’s and other social networks’ failures to address privacy, security, and transparency that are responsible, although making significant contributions to the paradigm shift. Charges of hacking – foreign and domestic – and misuse of data have raised consumers’ emotional hackles,” noted Passikoff.

“Data breeches in the past year alone – along with failure to disclose – by brands like Macy’s, Saks, Adidas, Panera, Delta, Under Armour, and Orbitz, have significantly increased the gap between what consumers expect and what brands deliver. There’s a new brand ‘yardstick’ for every category,” said Passikoff. “Consumers may still shop, but they’re increasingly wary.”

Categories That Dodged “Trust” Expectations Bullets

“Ten categories dodged the ‘trust-bullet’ this year,” noted Passikoff. “Trust hasn’t disappeared from the engagement and path-to-purchase process, and expectations always increase Y-O-Y, they just haven’t escalated in their contribution to loyalty the way it has in the remaining 80 categories.” Those 10 categories – and attendant increases – include:

  1. 1. Out-of-Home Coffee (8%)
  2. 2. Pizza (7%)
  3. 3. Non-Alcoholic Beverages (7%)
  4. 4. Toys (6%)
  5. 5. Snack Foods (5%)
  6. 6. Gasoline (3%)
  7. 7. Economy Hotels (3%)
  8. 8. Lip Balm (2%)
  9. 9. Parcel Delivery (2%)
  10. 10. Printers (2%)

Where “Trust” Matters Most In B2B Sectors

Individual attributes, benefits, and brand values make specific contributions to consumer brand engagement and loyalty. In 2019, consumer expectations regarding B2B “trust” increased as follows:

  1. 1. Credit Cards 160%
  2. 2. Online Payments 117%
  3. 3. Smartphones 105%
  4. 4. Wireless Carriers 99%
  5. 5. Banks 99%
  6. 6. Tax Preparation 99%
  7. 7. File Hosting 95%
  8. 8. Computers 86%
  9. 9. MFP Copiers 26%
  10. 10. Parcel Delivery 2%

“The B2B category has changed in the past half-decade,” noted Passikoff. “Values related to B2B and B2C loyalty and emotional engagement have been converging. “It’s showing up in the consumers’ desires for more personalized, customized service, with B2C response times attached to everything ‘business-related.’”

“Trust” = Engagement = Loyalty = Brand Profitability

’Brand engagement’ is best defined by how well a brand meets consumers’ expectations for values that drive purchase behavior,” noted Passikoff. “Consumers have an Ideal image for every product and service; it’s how they measure brands. In recent years a more emotionally-based process has created a more value-infused, complicated path-to-purchase as it regards ‘trust.’ If marketers think they know consumers’ trust levels for their brands, this year they need to take another look preferably using methods more precise than traditional brand tracking.”

A complete list of the CLEI’s 90 categories can be found:

http://brandkeys.com/portfolio/customer-loyalty-engagement-index

Consumers Verify First, Then Trust

Decision-making has become more emotionally-driven over the past decade,” said Passikoff. “But the addition of increased desire for trust and transparency have changed category landscapes. ‘Business as usual,’ ‘Research as usual,’ won’t cut it in today’s brandscape. Based on the 2019 Customer Loyalty Engagement Index findings, consumers’ behavioral maxim is ‘verify first, then trust.’”

The result? Massive changes in what consumers want and equally massive gaps between what they want and what brands are delivering. “Real engagement metrics keep brands on the path to profitability,” noted Passikoff. “Building brand trust isn’t a matter of technique or more social networking, but the development of actual, believable brand character and values.”

Methodology

For the 2019 CLEI survey, 51,673 consumers, 16 to 65 years of age from the nine US Census Regions, self-selected the categories in which they are consumers and the brands for which they are customers. Forty-five (45%) percent were interviewed by phone, forty-five (45%) percent via face-to-face interviews (cell phone-only households), and 10% were interviewed online.

Brand Keys uses an independently-validated research methodology that fuses emotional and rational aspects of the categories, identifies four path-to-purchase behavioral drivers for the category-specific Ideal, and identifies the values (including “trust” as it is characterized in a particular category) that form the components of each driver, along with their percent-contribution to engagement, loyalty, and profitability.

These assessments are leading-indicators of consumer behavior, identifying such activities 12 to 18 months before they appear in traditional brand tracking or in focus groups. Brand Keys’ research technique, a combination of psychological inquiry and statistical analyses, has a test/re-test reliability of 0.93, and produces results generalizable at the 95% confidence level. It has been successfully used in B2B and B2C categories in 35 countries.