OmniChannel

Why Omnichannel Consumers Are So Valuable

“Omnichannel” isn’t simply a trendy marketing buzzword or a flash in the pan – just ask customers. According to Business Insider and insight from the Harvard Business Review, “Shoppers who engage with retailers across multiple touchpoints are driving boosts in conversion rates both online and offline as they become increasingly reliant on more than one channel to aid in their purchasing decisions.” Multiple touchpoints are necessary for engaging customers and increasing sales, but those touchpoints have to work together in an omnichannel – not just multichannel – strategy. Here are three ways that Business Insider says omnichannel consumers are highly valuable:

1. They spend more money per purchase. Every time the consumer is in an actual store, they spend 4% more. When online, they spend 10% more. This spending is higher than shoppers who interact with brands via just one channel.

2. Customer loyalty is increased. Customers who engage on various channels visit real-life stores 23% more over a six-month period. They are also likely to recommend the brands to their peers.

3. Customers who engage with retailers on four or more channels spend 9% more in a brick-and-mortar store.

Ultimately, the more ways a customer can engage with a brand, the more money they’ll spend. When omnichannel is setup in the contact center, the customer knows that they will get up-to-date support no matter when or how they choose to engage. When self-service fails, they can seamlessly contact an agent who will pick up right where they left off – customer information is synced live so the agent can get all necessary information immediately. In addition to customer support, omnichannel ensures that inventory and product information is the same regardless of where it’s accessed. Inventory is synced in real time. Overall, building trust with the consumer increases brand loyalty as well as sales.

Soon, brands will have to also embrace the Internet of Things as wearable gadgets grow in popularity. These devices are collecting a ton of data about current and potential customers. CRM systems will need to measure analytics that come from the Internet of Things and find contemporary ways to market to those customers with each new platform that emerges. Omnichannel strategies embrace new methods for collecting important customer data, as each channel and device that’s added to the strategy is able to inform and improve the others.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-omnichannel-consumers-are-more-valuable-2017-1

Warning Signs That You Need to Improve Your Omnichannel Strategy

Consumers want – and expect – a precise, efficient and personalized customer service experience every time they interact with a brand. They need to be able to shop, get information or troubleshoot from anywhere whenever they want. When brands don’t meet these expectations, they can lose their customer base as well as their reputation. By creating and employing an omnichannel strategy, you can provide customers with a reliable, consistent journey across every channel.

Omnichannel seamlessly integrates all avenues of support, including live chat, phone, email, mobile and social media, so that consumers can switch their contact channel midway through an issue and still pick up right where they left off. However, even companies that think they have an omnichannel strategy in place are still making big mistakes.

There are a lot of “blind” channels out there. Omnichannel is all about contact channels communicating with each other, not just two or three channels being able to sync. Having your live chat, email and phone teams able to provide seamless support isn’t good enough if mobile and social media are still on a multichannel strategy. This could mean that a customer could get far along in an issue using two channels, but then lose ground when switching to a third channel, requiring them to explain the issue from the beginning. If you’re going to adopt an omnichannel strategy, it has to be implemented across the board without any blindspots.

Another mistake companies make is not maximizing mobile channels as part of their omnichannel strategy. Today’s customers use mobile devices to do things like read emails or brand newsletters and window shop for items they want to buy later on, possibly from another device, like their computer. An omnichannel strategy should capture customer information when they’re on mobile and then use it to personalize their experience elsewhere.

For example, when a customer clicks an item in a shop’s mobile app, that same item can pop up the next time the customer visits the website from their laptop (where they’re more likely to make the purchase). The customer can get an offer for something like special pricing or free shipping in order to encourage them to make the purchase. In this way, the customer can begin the shopping experience on one channel and then pick it up on another channel at some point in the future.

Warning Signs That You Need to Improve Your Omnichannel Strategy

Consumers want – and expect – a precise, efficient and personalized customer service experience every time they interact with a brand. They need to be able to shop, get information or troubleshoot from anywhere whenever they want. When brands don’t meet these expectations, they can lose their customer base as well as their reputation. By creating and employing an omnichannel strategy, you can provide customers with a reliable, consistent journey across every channel.

Omnichannel seamlessly integrates all avenues of support, including live chat, phone, email, mobile and social media, so that consumers can switch their contact channel midway through an issue and still pick up right where they left off. However, even companies that think they have an omnichannel strategy in place are still making big mistakes.

There are a lot of “blind” channels out there. Omnichannel is all about contact channels communicating with each other, not just two or three channels being able to sync. Having your live chat, email and phone teams able to provide seamless support isn’t good enough if mobile and social media are still on a multichannel strategy. This could mean that a customer could get far along in an issue using two channels, but then lose ground when switching to a third channel, requiring them to explain the issue from the beginning. If you’re going to adopt an omnichannel strategy, it has to be implemented across the board without any blindspots.

Another mistake companies make is not maximizing mobile channels as part of their omnichannel strategy. Today’s customers use mobile devices to do things like read emails or brand newsletters and window shop for items they want to buy later on, possibly from another device, like their computer. An omnichannel strategy should capture customer information when they’re on mobile and then use it to personalize their experience elsewhere.

For example, when a customer clicks an item in a shop’s mobile app, that same item can pop up the next time the customer visits the website from their laptop (where they’re more likely to make the purchase). The customer can get an offer for something like special pricing or free shipping in order to encourage them to make the purchase. In this way, the customer can begin the shopping experience on one channel and then pick it up on another channel at some point in the future.

How to Determine Whether a Contact Center Enhances the Customer Experience…or Detracts from it

It’s no secret …every time that a customer is involved with a company, they are evaluating whether to continue doing business with it. This makes every interaction critical, whether it’s a simple transactional exchange or high-impact conversation. Each interaction provides an opportunity to deliver the best possible customer experience, but it also presents the danger of a creating a negative impression that permanently damages the relationship. The contact center is of course the pivotal point of that customer journey. When agents don’t have the right tools, a business doesn’t just miss out on the chance to make a good impression, it could actually lose customers.

But how can an organization objectively and accurately evaluate how effective their contact center solution is in enabling a superior customer experience? Factors that need to be taken into consideration include:

  • Channel capabilities. Are customers able to reach out to the business via a variety of key methods, beyond just voice and IVR, such as web, chat email, text, social media and mobile? Are there preference management options in place that allow customers to consistently access their channel of choice? Are agents trained to guide interactions through multiple contact channels?
  • Convenience/speed/self-service. Does the IVR recognize callers based on their phone number? Does it use Natural Language to better understand responses? Do agents have access to all necessary data, such as account information and contact history, across all channels? Is first contact resolution currently being measured and if so, how high is the rate?
  • Caller satisfaction/Customer journey. Are customer expectations as they apply to the contact center being analyzed? Is customer satisfaction currently being measured? Is agent performance being tracked as it relates to stated business objectives? Is the customer journey being mapped and if so, are common customer pain points and key moments being identified?

No two organizations will have the same answers to these questions. Almost all companies operate at a different level of technology. But every business can benefit from gaining a comprehensive overview of the experience its contact center provides, and from exploring the many ways it can be improved. Take part in a complimentary interactive workshop  that will offer an individualized internal analysis which can be used to help plan for necessary improvements.