Contact Center Issues, Their Costs to the Business, and How to Avoid Them

U.S. survey of 209 contact center managers and directors showed that over the past two years, organizations have seen a jump in complaints about U.S. contact center operations, rising from almost 550M negative calls in 2008 to more than 770M in 20101. To imagine how these issues can negatively impact the bottom line, consider the following statistics.

A survey of 8,800 consumers conducted in 16 countries revealed that the average value across all countries in one year of each customer relationship lost to a competitor or abandoned is $243. Some examples of specific numbers by country include $396 in the UK, $330 in Canada, and close to $300 in the U.S. Remember, that is one single customer. Now multiply that times a thousand — or several thousand. In fact, the total cost of poor customer service in 16 key economies is $338.5B. Moreover, nearly 70% of consumers said they had ended a relationship due to poor customer service alone.2

How often does poor customer service occur? Across Europe and North America, calls fail an average of more than 18% of the time — and this is not even necessarily during a period of high call volume. 79% of consumers globally report experiencing poor voice quality and 68% of consumers will hang up and/or call a competitor if they experience poor voice quality.3

An Empirix white paper will give you clues how to understand your contact center issues, their costs to do business and to avoid them.

2 “The Cost of Poor Customer Service — The Economic Impact of the Customer Experience and Engagement in 16 Key Economies”, by Genesys,Datamonitor/Ovum, and Greenfield Online, November 2009
3 “Could You Repeat That Please — The Costs and Impact on the Customer Experience of Poor Voice Quality”, “The Machine Doesn’t Understand Me— The Costs and Impact on the Customer Experience of Poor Voice Quality, Professor Morris Pentel, Chairman, Customer Experience Foundationand Empirix, September 2010 and November 2010

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